15 June 1917

Extract from war diary of 6th Bn, 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment

Coulomby

The Battalion undergoing special training in open warfare, etc., on the training area.  Artillery formations, extended order drill, musketry, etc. constituting the programme of training carried out.

5 O.R. to Hospital Sick.   1 O.R. to Hospital Wounded.

Extract from war diary of 9th Bn, 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment

Front line

There was very heavy hostile shelling on the front area, where a new trench system was being formed.  Calls for retaliation were constantly coming down from Coys.  From 4-30 p.m to 6-30 p.m. a very heavy bombardment was put up on our line.  Casualties were slight, only one or two men being wounded.  Orders were received to carry out patrols on the front with a view to gaining touch with the enemy.  Reports by patrols lead by 2Lts COLVIN and READ are appended.  These officers were complimented by the Brigadier on the way in which these patrols were carried out.

14 June 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

We got up at 1.30 AM loaded our camels at 2, & marched at three o’clock to Dar el Belah, taking about three hours to reach the division dump, where we halted till our fumigating train was ready for us. We put everything in the train & left our men walking about indecently, & the staff was steamed. John Lonsdale, who is pompous & inefficient, made himself rather a nuisance. We marched back in full marching order, having had our packs carried for us on the outward journey in limbers, & got in by 10 PM, having done about twenty miles.

13 June 1917

Extract from war diary of 5th Bn, 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment

Telegraph Hill

Capt E.S. HERON and SEC-LT N. ARMSTRONG proceeded on short leave to PARIS.

Specialist platoon of “D” Coy returned to Headquarters Camp at 8.30pm

One platoon worked on TILLOY-WANCOURT Road, one platoon worked at RITZ DUMP, one platoon made infantry track from Headquarters Camp to TILLOY-WANCOURT Road. SAPPER section and PIONEER section are engaged on improvements to Headquarters Camp. Remainder of companies worked on communication trenches.

11 June 1917

Extract from the diary of LCpl Walter Williamson, 6th Bn, 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment

We continued our march, passing through Ledringhe to barn billets near Arneke, only about 10 miles today in view of a big march to come.

Having a look round with Bob Atkinson, a Lewis Gunner, we were delighted to find what we judged was quite a decent bathing pond. Bob tried it with a pole, and finding what proved to be the only deep spot in it (which we did not realize at the time), said there was any amount of water, so we stripped and dived together, and buried our noses in black slime at the bottom of 30 inches of water, and to add insult to injury, the farmer came along while we were trying to clean ourselves again, and screeched some most terrible French at us, and being patient with him, we eventually managed to understand that he did not allow dirty soldiers to use his clean cow’s clean water, or something to that effect, and the only thing we could think of in reply was to ask him if he kept eggs, and finding he did we first ordered ours for tea and then warned the others that eggs might be had at the kitchen.