Tag: Egypt

15 August 1917

Extract from war diary of LCpl Alexander Saunders, 8th Bn, 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment [In Mesopotamia]

Stand to 4am. Gunfire 5. Fatigues until 7. 7 to 745 bathing. 8am breakfast. 830 rifle inspection. 5pm fatigues till 6. 6 to 630 bathing 7 to 750 stand to.

 

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

I went to the Military School of Aeronautics at Abbassia & saw the adjutant & the doctor about Sam Ashton. He had confessed to the doctor how his nerves had broken down, and the doctor is going to report that he is unfit for the RFC & ask for a Board upon him, recommending that he be sent to England. He said he felt fairly sure that he could manage it especially as he can report that I went to see him as senior remaining officer of the Cheshire Yeo: on the subject. I am afraid that Sam might easily commit suicide in his present state, for his mind is a bit shaky. Hugh was not well, & could not face dinner.

7 August 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

We turned out for another damned attack, & the men are so fed up that they take no interest at all in the proceedings, & really are not trying at all. Personally I do not feel surprised and can hardly blame them, for I am deadly bored. At times we all get depressed & I am particularly down-hearted just now, for the war does not seem to be going well, and may continue for years. One after envies those who get shot neatly in the first few months of the war. Went out with H. Lonsdale, who returned today, & Hugh, to fix up a scheme for tomorrow. In two hour he could fix nothing – an awful exhibition!

25 July 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

Parade & company commanders’ pow-wow. We heard that only two men were wounded by all the shelling of the bivouacs in front of us yesterday – which is incredibly small in comparison with the alarming appearance of the incident. We were also warned that we must expect to have a dose of it soon, as the Turks are systematically working through the bivouac areas! Geoffrey Whitmore came to stay with the battalion, on leave from Cairo! He is an instructor in topography at Zeitoun now. Some vicious shelling by our guns in the evening.

24 July 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

Parades yesterday morning. There was a lot of shelling of somebody’s bivouacs about a mile ahead of ours. It looked rather bad, & men were running about a lot. I don’t know what the casualties were, but probably not as bad as appearances suggested. Our position seems a very dangerous one if we were spotted. In the evening, a few more shells dropped in the same place, & I saw two wretched horses left struggling on the ground. We had company night operations, which were not a creditable show!

20 July 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

Examinations were on, so Goldsmith & I had nothing to do. I had a bathe in the morning. My only objection to the bathing is the chance of swimming into some ghastly relic of a torpedoed ship. I hear one fellow found a human scalp at our bathing-place yesterday! There was a final orgy in the evening when we asked the officers of the school staff to dine, & got in a small quantity of “fizz”. Christie dined with me. Several of us had to make speeches, & many were rather light.

7 July 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

A woman’s body was washed up last night, probably from the Caledonian. It makes one hope that there will be no peace yet awhile, until fuller vengeance has been achieved. A half-holiday today. I had intended to go into El Arish with Goldsmith but I went to sleep & failed to wake up till too late. In the evening we played Bridge, the first time for months. Another body or two came in in the evening, making a total of 4 woman, or more accurately three and a half! No wonder sharks have increased.