Tag: Maj P K Glazebrook

17 October 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

A rotten night, with little sleep I have been in poor form in that way for some time. Even at Shepherd’s, with a good bed, I was not sleeping at all well. I am also being sick after breakfast, which is most inconvenient in these places where there is not privacy! At present I go inside the ruined Sheikh’s Tomb. A dull parade as usual in the morning, and nothing in the afternoon, except private instruction from Noel for me & Kynaston with the bayonet. Tom had gone off on another reconnaissance, lucky devil! We had a night march which was less unpleasant than usual, as we got back at 9 PM, and did not go very far. Much skin off my hands from bayonet work.

[follow-on] The depression of our life is by no means diminishing, & my own actually increases. The dust & dirt of our surroundings, the swarms of flies & the constant little worries of military life & discipline, make even the time off parade a positive hell. The nights would be a relief if I could sleep better, but now they seem terribly long, & lying on the dusty ground is not luxury. Reading is nearly impossible, & driving weary men in packs to repeat monotonous attacks, in which interest ceased long, long ago, is damnable. Contempt for the Lonsdales does not improve matters, & I can say that the 24 hours contain no moment of enjoyment or recreation for me. “The days have come & the time draweth nigh, when I can say, ‘I have no pleasure in them’.” I am exactly in that condition described by Swinburne – “To say at dusk, would God the day were here – to say at dawn, would God the day were done”. In every walk of life man has some pleasure to look forward to daily, or even weekly, for instance, his night’s rest, his good food, his game of cards or golf, his comfortable half hour with his daily papers by the fire, his Sunday’s quiet, or some hobby or interest. Here we have absolutely none, & nothing to look forward to until the end of the war, & for England’s sake one is even afraid of to early a peace. The Brooks boys alone make life tolerable.

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10 October 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

I went down to Alexandria in the morning & met Sam Ashton at the Savoy Hotel, where I took a room. He and Bennett, who was looking after Sam when I saw them last, had lunch with me. Bennett has now had a nervous collapse too, & is out of the Flying Corps. Sam is a lot better, but his future is very uncertain, as he is out of both Flying & in a way, the battalion as well. Most of the shops shut because of the Sultan’s funeral today. I dined with Bennett & Dobson. The latter was quite interesting on the subject of position in Arabia, especially the doings of Lawrence.

[Follow-on] Dobson, a bimbashi [sic.] of the Egyptian army, was rather interesting about Wej & the Hedjaz. He has been at Wej for some time, & we are holding it with Egyptian troops. The Turks at Medina, about 7000, are cut off at present, & so of course are those in Yemen. The Hedjaz is full of English gold, Four sovereigns being given for a sheep. The King, late Sherif of Mecca get £250,000 a month! Lawrence, a young fellow who is blowing up railways etc like Hornby, & who destroyed the line at Maan, has done wonders, & has been within two miles of Damascus from Akaba, which latter place we hold. The Turks are said to have put a price of £50,000 on Lawrence’s head, but he is well served by Arab Sheikhs, & has had £200,000 to play with. He has been made a major & give a C.B already.

1 October 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

We had some Lewis gun shooting in the morning for all the company. The reconnaissance of tomorrow necessitated all those taking part in it going off after lunch, to sleep on the way. It is hell being out of it, & I have applied for leave, to get away from it all. We had an idle afternoon with the sand blowing about abominably, covering everything we possess. Eason was on the afternoon digging and Kynaston at night. I heard from Perkins, of the second line, whom I am trying to get out here, as he is a friend of Noel’s.

30 September 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

Nothing to do all morning. Tom came back in the middle of the day as he is to go on a reconnaissance on Tuesday, with a view to commanding the company in the coming “show”, while I skulk about in the safety behind! There was a pow-wow on the scheme in the evening, to which I was admitted as a sort of benevolent neutral! Then I went up to Windy Post for the night digging & got back at midnight

27 September 1917

Extract from war diary of 1st Bn, 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment

Serques

Bn paraded at 5-30 pm. for the presentation by Brigadier-General M. TURNER, C.B. of the Flag for the best all round Company during the month.  Letter “C” Company received the Flag.  See copy of TNG 1 attached

Battalion under orders to move to another area at short notice

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

The Colonel told me about being left behind, of which I was not surprised to know last night. Of course I protested and asked to be allowed to go, & am not quite without hope. For the company, & especially Tom & Noel to go into a hot action while I skulked in rear would be too damnable for anything. The Colonel himself is being left, much to his sorrow. Parades in the morning while Eason went digging. Nothing much to do in afternoon.

25 September 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

I had to take my own company & then No 3 company on the range, for a morning’s shooting. Eason & 70 of our men went out to dig at 2 PM. A company commander 5’ pow-wow at 3 PM, so no afternoon rest possible before night work. I had 150 men to take out to the trenches at Windy Post, where we were bombing up the front of the parapets with sand. The Turks saw us in the moonlight & turned on a machine-gun, very straight too. We lay in the holes from which we had been digging out sand, & when we ran in twos & threes back to the trenches, fired. Some men left their rifles out in front, & did not like fetching them, so I insulted them by going out and collecting the rifles & a few spades & handing them politely & silently into the trench. One RE wounded.

14 September 1917

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

We again had reveille at 4.30, which is developing into an extremely bad habit. We marched out for a battalion field day, doing the usual formal “attack”. Tom had to go off parade with violent indigestion, which may be a reflection on the canteen white wine. Luckily I took the red, & a whole bottle of it too. We had an afternoon parade, which is an awful bore & interferes seriously with one’s rest. Dust blowing about damnably, & everything filthy.