Tag: Maj P K Glazebrook

7 March 1918

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

A quite night for our last night in bed, though a few shells came over at dawn, into our Wady, doing no harm.

THE DIARIST WAS KILLED IN ACTION THIS DAY.

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6 March 1918

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

A quite night. Battalion were out roadmaking, but Kynaston & I were detailed for the job luckly. Very cold wind in the morning. Tom & I went for a spy round the front of the hill & met General Girdwood, who sat with us in a friendly way for a bit & told us all the news. The Turks have not retired, so we are up against out attack after all, but Girdwood thinks they are weak in numbers. There was a Pow-Wow of the CO`s in the morning, & the results were handed on to us in the evening. our battalion leads in the attack, & I think a good many of us will get knocked out when the Turks makes up his mind to retire quickly. No 1 & 2 company are to load followed by my No4 & with No 3 in reserve. There is already a good deal of feeling about No 3 being kept behind before.

3 March 1918

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

Shells actually burst in No 1 Company, & marvellously missed everyone.   Twice our beds were spattered with earth etc from the explosions. Riffle fire & occasional bombs going all night. The 24th Welsh were successful, but not the 24th RWF, I hear, so we have not got quite the line we wanted. During the day there was a little shelling on both sides, but none near us. The little camp on Garden Hill, next to us, got very accurately shelled, & has obviously been spotted by aeroplanes. We had a quiet day, and did nothing except try to make a few little shelters, but it is a bad place for them, Casualties last night were practically nil, I believe. Got all our tents up but I doubt if it is wise. Two years today since I left England.

27 February 1918

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

It was raining hard in the morning, & we had to pack up tents & everything and march along the Nablus road, through Birch, to a point about a mile North of a lake called Balua. The march was bad, rain mud & hail, but the arrival was worse, as our camp area was a muddy swamp and we got these about noon. Somehow we got the tents up, & then collected stones to have them with raising the stove floors above the mud level. It rained furiously nearly all the time with a strong cold wind. Our cooks managed to get a fire going & made tea. Nearly everything was wet through, but once we had got into our tents, life became bearable again. A shell or two fell within about half a mile.

26 February 1918

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

I was in charge of the road making party, & worked on the main Nablus road , interrupted by traffic all the time, During the morning I got orders to send No1 Company in at once, as they had to go up into the line under Tom. We came in for lunch & Tom’s company got away about two o`clock. Corporal Fairbrother & Lawley were up before Peter, John for Slackness on guard, & I attended the utter abscence of all service of justice in the Lonsdales is astounding. Nothing that the accused says he has the best influence, & he accepts a note from the brigade major as absolutely accurate in every detail, against the evidence of the men. We hear that we move up tomorrow into reserve behind the line, in the war area again.

22 February 1918

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

We got to Gaza soon after 6.am & got some tea there & then proceeded very slowly to Ludd. The country is now green all the way & lots of bright red poppies are out. When we got to Ludd we found there was nobody there who knew that our train was coming at all, but we all went to the refreshment camp, about two miles away, & there Jock Cowell was reigning. I shared his tent & servant with him, and felt I had fallen on my feet. Jock has now left us & got the job of running the re-inforcement [sic.] camp, which is comparatively new. Ludd is railhead at present. I believe Jericho has been taken  successfully , with little trouble, which looks as if our fellows wont have been fighting.

20 February 1918

Extract from the diary of Maj P K Glazebrook, Cheshire Yeomanry, Egypt Expeditionary Force

Curtis arrived here on his way to Cairo on leave, & says that a show began yesterday, in which our own Brigade are in reserve, & Jericho is to be taken today! He actually saw the fighting yesterday, & it was going very well, our fellows were a good safe distance from it. If only I had known, Im sure I could have got there in time. I went to Port Said for the day and found it a dull & quite spot, changed from its old peace-time aspect . I rang up Sam Ashton on the telephone , but only got him about an hour before my train was due to start for Kantara. We sat at the marina Palace for a bit & he came down to see me off. Got back soon after eight o’clock.