13 February 1918

Extract from war diary of 1st Bn, 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment

Trentini sector front line, Italy

Weather cold, visibility bad.

2 attempts to cross the PIAVE at 10 p.m. and 12 midnight in “BARTHON” Boats, failed owing to the strength of the current and the boats collapsing.

No casualties

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12 February 1918

Extract from war diary of 6th Bn, 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment

Trenches, WIELTJE

Battalion in line.   Continued artillery activity.   Front lines and C.Ts slightly damaged.   Fatigues engaged making good the damage caused, clearing dug-outs and relaying duck boards.

Enemy was unusually quiet between 6pm and 10-30pm. and as a relief was suspected our Lewis Guns played intermittently on his C.Ts and other points.  115 coils wire put out.

2 OR to hospital wounded.

11 February 1918

Extract from war diary of 6th Bn, 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment

Trenches, WIELTJE

Battalion in line.   Considerable artillery activity all day.  Enemy retaliated heavily to our barrages and shelling with 77mm.  Generally engaged making good damage caused to trenches and putting out wire.   2 Patrols reconnoitred the front.

10 reinforcements joined.    3 OR rejoined.

10 February 1918

Extract from war diary of 6th Bn, 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment

Trenches, WIELTJE

Battalion in the line.  Considerable artillery activity on both sides both day and night, enemy replying immediately to our barrages.  Very active with trench mortars, rifle grenades and whiz-bangs.  Front line trenches slightly damaged.

2 OR killed.  5 OR to hospital sick.  8 OR hospital wounded.

7 February 1918

Extract from the diary of Capt Ferguson, 1st Bn, 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment 

Our work here is light, but I am making cover trenches round my houses, in case the Austrian feels like fighting; up to now, he leaves everything to the Hun bombers on their nightly straf. One came down in a field a few nights ago, and the pilot left his plane intact, but was caught trying to get over the PIAVE last night. I have also put in time by visiting the front line with my NCOs who have now all been to the parts they will have to hold. It is again dry here, but one need never use the trench, as the big embankment gives wonderful protection, and hides everything; even ration carts roll up at night, dropping rations at every coy HQ, saving endless fatigue. At present the river is not very wide, and much wire is put out on the shingle bed. The view from the posts on the embankment is perfect, as the opposite bank rises up to the snow-capped hills, and is studded with small white villages and farmhouses. In fact, the line is perfect in every way.